LEVITZACKS, Certified Public Accountants
(Tax, Audit, Estate Planning, Litigation, Consulting)
Newsletters

Tax Alerts
Tax Briefing(s)

Important Accounting Changes on the Horizon that May Impact Your Business...

Click here to read how this change may impact your organization.

Click here to download a summary of the AICPA's Working Group's current issues and their status.

The enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act in late 2017 (TCJA) was a game changer.  We are well-versed in what the rules of the TCJA purport to be, but there is still much uncertainty in some of the implementation details.  Guidance from the IRS continues to trickle in and with each installment of pronouncements more planning opportunities become apparent, even as consensus among tax advisors about the “real rules” of the game become more established.  The year-end tax planning guides can provide a general overview of major areas to consider as tailored to Individuals, Investors, and Businesses.  Because we stay focused on continuing developments, including potential legislative changes and IRS pronouncements, we encourage you to both check our website at lz-cpa.com/newsletter.html and contact us about any special areas of your concern.

As a result of the TCJA, payroll withholding tables were revised earlier this year.  In some situations, it may be prudent to revisit your claimed withholding exemptions and our year-end projections can assist in that effort.  In addition, there are enhanced deferral techniques, state tax minimization strategies, novel estate planning techniques that combine estate tax minimization with major income tax savings for future generations, and other great ideas we look forward to sharing as they may apply to your unique situations that we encounter.  As thought leaders, we strive to anticipate the next moves of the game in these and several other areas.

In the meantime, we hope you find this year’s general tax planning brochure beneficial, if nothing more than to spark interest in seeking clarification about how the new and existing rules are applied to you.  We look forward to continuing to provide quality tax preparation and exceptional consulting services.


The Senate has approved a bipartisan IRS reform bill, which now heads to President Trump’s desk. Trump is expected to sign the bill into law.


Taxpayers may rely on two new pieces of IRS guidance for applying the Code Sec. 199A deduction to cooperatives and their patrons:


The IRS has issued final regulations that require taxpayers to reduce the amount any charitable contribution deduction by the amount of any state and local tax (SALT) credit they receive or expect to receive in return. The rules are aimed at preventing taxpayers from getting around the SALT deduction limits. A safe harbor has also been provided to certain individuals to treat any disallowed charitable contribution deduction under this rule as a deductible payment of taxes under Code Sec. 164. The final regulations and the safe harbor apply to charitable contribution payments made after August 27, 2018.


Final regulations address the global intangible low-taxed income (GILTI) provisions of Code Sec. 951A. The final regulations retain the basic approach and structure of the proposed regulations published on October 10, 2018. The final regulations address open questions and comments received on the proposed regulations.


Newly issued temporary regulations limit the application of the Code Sec. 245A participation dividends received deduction (the participation DRD) and the Code Sec. 954(c)(6) exception in certain situations that present an opportunity for tax avoidance. The temporary regulations also provide related information reporting rules under Code Sec. 6038.


Final regulations reduce the Code Sec. 956 amount for certain domestic corporations that own stock in controlled foreign corporations (CFCs). The regulations are intended to ensure that Code Sec. 956 is applied consistently with the participation exemption system under Code Sec. 245A.


Final rules allow employers to use health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs) to reimburse employees for the purchase individual insurance coverage, including coverage on an Affordable Care Act Exchange. The rules also allow "excepted benefit HRAs," which would not have to be integrated with any coverage. The rules generally apply for plan years starting on or after January 1, 2020.


Final regulations provide requirements that a person must satisfy to become and remain a certified professional employer organization (CPEO), as well as the CPEO’s federal employment tax liabilities and other obligations.


The IRS has released the 2018 optional standard mileage rates to be used to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business, medical, moving and charitable purposes. Beginning on January 1, 2018, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car, van, pickup of panel truck will be:

  • 54.5 cents per mile for business miles driven (up from 53.5 cents in 2017);
  • 18 cents per mile for medical and moving expenses (up from 17 cents in 2017); and
  • 14 cents per mile for miles driven for charitable purposes (permanently set by statute at 14 cents).

Comment. A taxpayer may not use the business standard mileage rate after using a depreciation method under Code Sec. 168 or after claiming the Code Sec. 179 deduction for that vehicle. A taxpayer may not use the business rate for more than four vehicles at a time. As a result, business owners have a choice for their vehicles: take the standard mileage rate, or “itemize” each part of the expense (gas, tolls, insurance, etc., and depreciation).


The start of a New Year presents a time to reflect on the past 12 months and, based on what has gone before, predict what may happen next. Here is a list of the top 10 developments from 2017 that may prove particularly important as we move forward into the New Year:


HomeInfo CenterNewslettersFinancial ToolsLinks